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More Eudora FAQs, with Answers

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Here are four more FAQs that seem not to have made it into any of the documentation that I have seen, or still seem to baffle people for some unknown reason. Qualcomm maintains the official Eudora FAQs. Pete Beim maintains a more extensive list of FAQsthan Qualcomm.
  1. How can I get Eudora to auto-respond or auto-forward?
  2. How do I convert Eudora mailboxes from/to other formats?
  3. How do I convert Eudora Nicknames/Address Book files to/from other formats?
  4. How do I use multiple nicknames files with Eudora? or How can I store nicknames on a server?
[ Back to Ken's main Eudora page | Ken's Home Page ]


Q1: How can I get Eudora to automatically forward my mail from one account to another, or generate a standard, automatic reply to email I receive (like the Unix vacation program)?

A: Not very long ago the answer to this was simple "you can't get there from here, so set it up on the server end or use Pegasus". Now there are more possibilities.

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Q2: How do I convert my Unix, Netscape, or mailboxes from other email programs to Eudora, or vice versa?

A: In my opinion, this is where Eudora shines over most other email programs for the MS Windows world: Eudora mailbox files are in the standard Unix mailbox format (Jamie Zawinski, designer of the mail client in Netscape has written to complainthat I don't mention that it, too, uses this standard format. Well, nowI've mentioned it.) In addition to the information below, Roger Hill has written a General Guide on Converting to Eudora Format. It explains the main concepts clearly and gives some specific examples. There is a separate section of this page for those interested in converting Eudora Nicknames, rather than mailboxes.

Three general tips for mailbox conversions

  1. If your mail program has a feature to compress or compact mailboxes, use it before attempting any conversions.
  2. If you are moving from one computing platform to another, e.g., Unix to MS Windows or Mac to MS Windows, be sure that you make the appropriate end-of-line (EOL) conversion. The simplest way to do this is to transfer the files from the source computer to the destination computer using ftp in ASCII mode. If it is already too late for that, you may need to find a utility to do the conversion for you. Those converting from Unix to MS Windows might be glad to know that you can do the EOL conversion by opening the Unix file in the MS-DOS editor (edit.com) and saving it again.
  3. If none of this works, you can always use the software you are switching from to email your store of saved messages to yourself, and then retrieve it using the software to which you are switching. It's not elegant, but it works. If switching from Eudora, use the Redirect option and it will preserve the header information for the original sender.
Converting To Eudora From:
      
Converting From Eudora To:
Pine, Elm, other Unix format

Pine, Elm, other Unix format
Netscape

Netscape
Pegasus

Pegasus
Agent

Agent
Lotus cc:Mail


Microsoft Mail (non-internet)


Microsoft Exchange

Microsoft Exchange
Microsoft Internet Mail

Microsoft Internet Mail
Microsoft Outlook

Microsoft Outlook
Microsoft Outlook Express

Microsoft Outlook Express
Z-Mail and Z-Mail Pro




Calypso


HTML or Plain Text


To any POP3 Client

For Unix (Pine, Berkeley mail, some others) to/from Eudora, simply:
  1. Transfer the mailbox files/folders from your Unix box to your PC, taking care to make the usual Unix<-->DOS end-of-line conversion. Using FTP in ASCII mode is perfect for this.
  2. Put the files in the directory where you keep your Eudora mailboxes. By default, this is the same directory as the Eudora program, although it is configurable on the command line.
  3. Rename the file to have an extension of .mbx
  4. Restart Eudora. Eudora will automatically recognize the mailbox, and build a corresponding .toc file for you.
  5. If you are transferring Pine "sent-mail*" folders, then your name will show up in the "Who" column in Eudora, rather than the recipient's name. You can avoid this by re-doing steps 2-4 above, with the following modifications:
    1. within Eudora, empty your Out mailbox, transferring messages to another mailbox as needed (you can transfer them back later),
    2. exit Eudora,
    3. name your Pine sent-mail folder out.mbx, and put it in the directorywhere your out.mbx file normally goes,
    4. delete out.toc in that directory (it should be 104 bytes in size),
    5. open Eudora, and your messages from the Pine sent-mail folder should appear in the Out mailbox. From here you can transfer them elsewhere, orleave them alone. You can also transfer back any saved outgoing messagesthat you transferred out in step (a).
    Alternatively, you can fix the name problem within Eudora by the following method, but it leaves the date field blank in the Eudora mailbox window:
    1. transferring the messages to Eudora's Out mailbox (responding "Yes" to the prompt about losing header information),
    2. transferring them back to the original mailbox (only if you don't want to keep them in the Out mailbox).
    As another alternative to dealing with the outgoing mail issue, you could edit Eudora's Out.toc file. You can learn about the mysteries of Eudora's .toc files in my compilation of notes on .toc file structure, which includes some utility programs for manipulating .toc files.
Note that you will lose status information (read/unread/replied/etc) when doing this conversion. You can change these manually in Eudora for all but the Out box. Or, if changing them manually doesnot appeal to you (as it didn't to me when I had a few hundred Pine messages to transfer into Eudora) you can take advantage of the factthat Pine sets the "Replied" or "Answered" status by inserting anX-Status: A header in the mail message itself. WithEudora Pro 3.x you can easily set up a filter to set the Eudora statusto "Replied" (R) for every message from Pine that has this header.

I also find this technique useful for keeping track in Eudora of messages that I have replied to using Pine, since I use both mail programs. That is, if I've replied to a message using Pine before downloading the message using Eudora, my Eudora filter will set the Eudora status to "R" as soon as it downloads it (and change the label to let me know that I replied in Pine, so I won't do a futile search all over my Eudora mailboxes trying to find my reply!). But I digress.

To convert from Eudora to Pine or others, simply do the same thing in reverse, noting that the other programs (or at least Pine) allow you to name the mailbox file/folder anything you want, so you can leave the .mbx extension as is or change it.


For Netscape Navigator (v 2.0 and later) to/from Eudora:
  1. Follow the same steps as above for Unix to Eudora, noting that you want the Netscape files without any extension, (eg, Sent, Inbox, etc.), and not the files with .snm extensions (these appear to be analogous to Eudora's .toc files).
  2. If you are transferring Netscape outgoing mail messages (e.g., the "Sent" folder), then your name will show up in the "Who" column in Eudora, rather than the recipient's name. You can avoid this by following the same method described for Pine sent-mailfolders, namely:
    1. within Eudora, empty your Out mailbox, transferring messages to another mailbox as needed (you can transfer them back later),
    2. exit Eudora,
    3. name your Netscape Sent folder out.mbx, and put it in the directorywhere your out.mbx file normally goes,
    4. delete out.toc in that directory (it should be 104 bytes in size),
    5. open Eudora, and your messages from the Netscape Sent folder should appear in the Out mailbox. From here you can transfer them elsewhere, orleave them alone. You can also transfer back any saved outgoing messagesthat you transferred out in step (a).

    Alternatively, you can deal with outgoing Netscape messages by the following method, but it leaves the date field blank in the Eudora mailbox window:
    1. transferring the messages to Eudora's Out mailbox (responding "Yes" to the prompt about losing header information),
    2. transferring them back to the original mailbox (only if you don't want to keep them in the Out mailbox).

    For yet another alternative, you can deal with with Netscape outgoing messages by the following method. I think this one displays the date OK, but instead showsthe wrong name, or no name, in the "Who" column of the mailbox display. I don't really remember any more, because I've been doing it by the first method listedfor a long time, as it retains all of the correct name and date information.
    1. Close Eudora.
    2. Copy Netscape's Sent (or equivalent) mailbox to Sent.mbx and put it in the directory where your Eudora mailboxes reside.
    3. Open Eudora.
    4. Open Sent.mbx, select all messages (mouse, Ctrl-A, or shift key and cursor keys) and transfer to the Out mailbox. Say "Yes" when Eudora asks if you want to do this even though you will lose status information.
    5. If you want to transfer the messages back to Sent.mbx you can do so,and the headers should display correctly in the mailbox window.
Note that you will lose status information (read/unread/replied/etc) when doing any conversion between Netscape and Eudora. You can change thestatus information manually in Eudora for all but the Out box. Changing status in the Out box requires digging into the mysteries of the out.toc file. If you are interested you can check out my compilation of notes on .toc file structure, which includes some utility programs for manipulating .toc files.

If you want to go the other way, that is, from Eudora to Netscape, you can pretty much just reverse the steps described above.


For Pegasus Mail to/from Eudora:

For Forte Agent to/from Eudora (contributed by Nick Spalding):
  1. Close Eudora if it is open.
  2. Open the folder's message list in Agent.
  3. Press Ctrl-a to highlight everything.
  4. Click on Files/Save As.
  5. Select 'UNIX message file' and 'All fields'.
  6. Make sure 'Append to existing file' is not checked.
  7. Navigate to the drive\directory where the Eudora data is stored,and enter somename.mbx as File Name. The .mbx is important.
  8. Click on OK.
  9. Now if you go to Eudora you will find a new mailbox called SOMENAMEwith all your agent folder's messages in it.
  10. Nick also reports that Agent "...will also happily import a Eudora .mbx direct into a folder."


For Lotus cc:Mail to Eudora:
Qualcomm, makers of Eudora, now have theEudora Migration Utilityavailable for free download. It converts from cc:Mail DB6 format (as used in cc:Mail release 2.x) to Eudora format.


For Microsoft Mail to Eudora:
Microsoft's insistence on using proprietary, non-publicly-documentedformats for email started a long time before it developed its Exchange and Internet Mail programs. If you want to migrate from the earlier MS Mail (as in non-internet mail) program to Eudora, see the convoluted process that NASA's Thermal Engineering Branch had to go through to make the switch from MS Mail to Eudora's open standards. It involves re-mailing the messages to yourself, retrieving them in Eudora, and then using a program calledFixHead to fix the headers to restore the original information about sender/recipient and subject.


For Microsoft Exchange to Eudora:


For Microsoft Internet Mail to Eudora:


For Microsoft Outlook to Eudora:
I've never used Microsoft Outlook, but I am told that it has the option to export messages to one of Microsoft's other formats, such as Exchange. Choose one of those export options, then follow the instructions for converting to Eudora from Microsoft Exchange orfrom Microsoft Internet Mail. From the comments of other users it appears that using MSIM as the intermediatestep might be the more painless route.


For Microsoft Outlook Express to Eudora:
Microsoft Outlook Express uses the same format as Microsoft Internet Mail. That'sright, Microsoft did not invent a new, incompatible proprietary format for their fourth mail package in the past two years -- they decided to use the sameproprietary format. This means that you can convert from MS Outlook Express byusing Brian Hook's program for converting from MS Internet Mailto Eudora.


For Eudora to Microsoft Internet Mail:


For Eudora to Microsoft Exchange:


For Eudora to Microsoft Outlook:
I am told that the easiest way to do this is to use Microsoft Internet Mail version 3.x or later. When installing Microsoft Internet Mail it willlocate Eudora or Netscape mail files and offer to convert them to theproprietary format used by MSIM. From that point you can export all ofthe messages to Outlook. Supposedly this method is not 100 percent reliable,but it works for some, and others like the convenience. Make that convenience relative to the alternatives. For details, see Slipstick Systems pageon this topic.


For Eudora to Microsoft Outlook Express:
I think that MS Outlook Express will recognize and convert Eudora mailboxes,but I still need to confirm that. If not, since Outlook Express uses the sameproprietary format as Microsoft Internet Mail, you can use the tools listedon this page under converting from Eudora to Microsoft Internet Mail.


For Z-Mail or Z-Mail Pro to Eudora:
Someone sent me a Perl script to convert from Z-Mail Pro or Z-Mail (now owned by Netmanage) to Eudora. It seems that the two use almost identical formats, but they are just enough different that the files require a little massaging to get Eudora to read them. The same is true going the other way, but thedeveloper's have included a converter in the Z-Mail package to take care that.


For Eudora to Calypso:
I received word from the developers of Calypso thatCalypso 2.4 (released 16 December 1997) stores mail in a proprietary, compressed format. However, it does have the ability to import email and folders from Eudora, as well as the ability to archive your mail out to a text file. However, it doesn't appear to be capable of exporting to othermailbox formats.


For Eudora to HTML or Plain Text:


For Eudora to any other POP3 Client:
Gary Bajaj's Power User [sic] Tipshas an innovative approach to converting from Eudora to any other POP3 client. His method exploits the fact that Eudora stores its mailboxes in standard internet format, so I imagine it would also work to convert fromNetscape, Pine, Elm, or other such programs to anything else as well. Touse his method you do need to have direct access to your mail spool on a host with a POP3 server, something that not a lot of people have (althoughit's not that hard to get).


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Q3: How do I convert Eudora Nicknames/Address Book files to/from other formats?

A: It's not a conversion utility per se, but my notes on Eudora Nickname file structure might provide some useful background information to those interested in converting Nicknames and address books. The following links may help you do what you want.

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Q4: How do I use multiple nicknames files with Eudora?
or How can I store nicknames on a server?

A: If you use Eudora Light, you can't. If you use Eudora Pro, there are two ways of using multiple nicknames files. Only one of them works for nicknames stored on a network server. Some users will also find it worthwhile to read my notes on Eudora Nickname file structure and Creating Additional Nickname/Address Book Files within Eudora.

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NOTE: The Eudora logo at the top of this page, and the names Eudora, Qualcomm, Adobe, Acrobat, Pine, Pegasus, and Windows are all registered trademarks and/or copyrighted by the respective companies. I have no connection with any of these companies other than that I am a satisfied user of their products (although to tell the truth, I'm not all that satisfied with Windows).

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